Managing Spring Allergies #ThisIsNow

Pine and other tree pollen burst onto Atlanta in the past couple of weeks, signaling that Spring allergies are officially here. If seasonal allergies cause misery for you, like they do for millions of Americans, here are some tips for dealing with spring allergies:

Avoid clothing made of synthetic fabrics, which, when rubbed together, can create an electrical charge that attracts pollen. Opt for natural fibers such as cotton, which also breathe better and stay drier, making them less likely to harbor mold.


Exercise outdoors when pollen counts are at their lowest -- before dawn and in the late afternoon and early evening. Because exercise causes you to breathe more deeply and inhale more pollen, try to do vigorous workouts indoors. If you're going out for an easy walk, take a nondrowsy antihistamine before you go.

If you garden, take an antihistamine about a half hour before you go outside. Digging up dirt can stir up pollen, so you should wear gloves and a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-rated 95 filter mask. Try not to touch your eyes. When you go back inside, wash your hands, hair and clothes.

Limit your exposure to indoor allergens to help reduce the severity of your spring allergies. Vacuum your furniture, leave your shoes by the door, shower often, cover floors with washable throw rugs, and use a dehumidifier and an air purifier with a HEPA filter.

If your allergy medications don't provide sufficient relief, consider allergy shots.

SOURCE: American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, news release, March 20, 2015

How GMC Can Help

In the past, little could be done to counteract chronic or seasonal sinus conditions. But today, physicians offer a range of helpful options, including Balloon Sinuplasty™ and other minimally invasive procedures. Learn more about allergies and sinus solutions at gwinnettmedicalcenter.org/sinus. Or find a physician near you. 

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